Score:0

CKeditor 5 generic block level styles

ru flag

Is it possible to define generic block level styles in CKeditor5, instead of targeting a specific HTML tag?

E.g. I can define this in editor.full_html.twig

settings:
  plugins:
    ckeditor5_style:
      styles:
        -
          label: 'looks like header 1'
          element: '<p class="h1">'
        -
          label: 'looks like header 2'
          element: '<p class="h2">'

But with this setting an editor can not style e.g. an <h3> to look like an .h2

Now I could add every single combination as style

settings:
  plugins:
    ckeditor5_style:
      styles:
        -
          label: 'P looks like header 1'
          element: '<p class="h1">'
        -
          label: 'H2 looks like header 1'
          element: '<h2 class="h1">'
        -
          label: 'H3 looks like header 1'
          element: '<h3 class="h1">'
        -
          label: 'H4 looks like header 1'
          element: '<h4 class="h1">'
        -
          label: '...(exaggerated example 300 lines later) H1 looks like header 6...'
          element: '<h1 class="h6">'

and I could live with the massive YAML config, but the styles combo in the admin UI gets equally polluted and flooded with so many disabled options that it becomes unusable.

Is there a way to define a style as "generic block level style"? E.g. a style .h1 that can be applied to any block tags like <p> and <h2> and <h3> and <h4> etc?

In CK4 a p.h4 was also available/mouse-clickable when the cursor was inside a <h3>. I don't know to to migrate that.

Score:1
gb flag

Currently it seems that this feature is not included in ckeditor5.
Take a look at https://github.com/ckeditor/ckeditor5/issues/12771.

I would recommend to add the styles in the YAML config once and hide the disabled styles in the panel, like described in this feature request https://github.com/ckeditor/ckeditor5/issues/12770.

.ck.ck-style-panel .ck-style-grid .ck-style-grid__button.ck-disabled {
    display: none; /* Add this */
}
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