Score:-1

Lengthy login delay for Windows 10/11 when not connected to domain

in flag

On various clean Windows 10 or 11 builds, all of which are domain-connected devices, if I log in from a cold boot using a domain account while having no network connection to the domain, I get lengthy delays before I am logged into the device.

When the device is on the corporate network, it logs in normally.

When off the network, the login delay used to be around a minute. Now, it's closer to 5 minutes.

I get that there may need to be a timeout period. This timeout period appears to be far too long or attempted multiple times or both.

How can I get this timeout down to a reasonable time? Just a few seconds should be plenty to discern if domain services are contactable.

Answering questions in comments:

  • Are there mapped network drives? Yes, but I do not think they get mapped until after the desktop appears, which is after the timeout completes.
  • Are any file or folders processed at logon? While I don't think so, how may I check that?
  • Is the system policy to wait for the network to be ready before processing settings? This group policy is set to Disabled: Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > Logon > Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon.
  • Do you have roaming profiles and are they large? In System Properties > Advanced > User Profiles > Settings, I show that all profiles are local.
  • what are your DNS servers set to when you're working remotely It just uses what DHCP provides, which are my ISP's servers.
Blind Spots avatar
aq flag
you need to provide more info and work with a test device. Are there mapped network drives? Are any file or folders processed at logon? Is the system policy to wait for the network to be ready before processing settings? Do you have roaming profiles and are they large?
kh flag
There's a similar discussion here (though no conclusion) https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/2197091-windows-logon-domain-controller-timeout-makes-logons-take-3-or-more-mins. From that though, what are your DNS servers set to when you're working remotely? If it's still set to an on prem server it could be that not only is that not resolving externally, but that your ISP/something upstream of you is intercepting the request for that server and giving you bad info, slowing things down (e.g. barefruit: https://gist.github.com/JohnLBevan/ec5991482e4ae02fcfd6c10d1a3b67b3)? Just a theory.
kh flag
Another thought... Can you disable wifi from a key on your keyboard/computer? Many laptops have a way to toggle this. If you disable your wifi before logging in, your laptop should see there's no connectivity so may skip waiting on network resources and go straight to cache; then once you've logged in you can re-enable wifi.
Score:-1
hk flag

can you provide more info? What happen during that time? did you collect any log? Such issue might be caused by several problems For instance:

  • Roaming profile size - just right click on the user profile folder to check their sizes

  • Group policies - here you can have multiple situations, it might have the " Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon"; "Hide an disable all items on the desktop".

  • A third party program is slowing down the user logon - you can try to clean the boot options to see whether the laptop goes faster

  • Corrupted roaming profile - rename the old one and create a new one. The user experience is still the same?

Tilman Schmidt avatar
bd flag
That is not an answer.
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