Score:1

Change shortcut to switch tab in gnome-terminal

zm flag

I found similar questions but none addresses the problem:

In gnome-terminal, I would like to change my shortcut to change tabs:

  • Switch to Previous Tab: Ctrl+Shift+Tab
  • Switch to Next Tab: Ctrl+Tab

Just like in every browser. However, if I try to set these options, gnome-terminal just returns an error sounds and it doesn't work. It seems like the tab key is messing things up, because every assignment that does not involve the tab key works fine.

Does anyone have a solution?

Score:1
cn flag

Apparently, the Preferences dialog does not allow you to set these keybindings indeed. However, it will work if you directly change the setting using the terminal, as in:

gsettings set org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Keybindings:/org/gnome/terminal/legacy/keybindings/ next-tab '<Control>Tab'
gsettings set org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Keybindings:/org/gnome/terminal/legacy/keybindings/ prev-tab '<Control><Shift>Tab'
ado sar avatar
jp flag
Why it does not allow it?
vanadium avatar
cn flag
@adosar Unfortunately I am not a developper, so I cannot tell you what conceptual or perhaps merely technical reasons would prohibit this from working in the Preferences dialog.
Tom avatar
au flag
Tom
Hi, I am using 22.04 but it doesn't work. I am hesitant to ask this by creating+posting another question in AskUbuntu. @vanadium if you have some insight in this problem, and if you could help me, it would be great.
Score:1
il flag

@vanadium answer is correct.

You can also set it via UI in the Gnome Terminal Preferences:

enter image description here

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