Score:0

Trying to make a decsion on backup scenario

us flag

I'm coming from a MacOS environment. TimeMachine just works...complete OS Files etc backup

I've seen Deja Dup and TimeShift but the tutorials don't explain exactly what they backup from a perspective of folders/files with paths.

I have a dual boot win/linux... Unbuntu 20.... 3 partitions / /mysql /nginx self explanatory.

So does a restore be like...Live USB CD...partition everything and then restore everything....

I guess I'll need my NGINX files because they contain my websites/Wordpress stuff. I'll need some kind of mysqldump I would guess and binary log files on a different drive.

I'm just not 100% sure of what I should be using.....

External USB drive here to back up to...

Nmath avatar
ng flag
I don't see a question here. [Edit](https://askubuntu.com/posts/1365650/edit) your question and make sure that there is a clearly defined problem and an answerable question. Remember that questions that solicit opinions are [off-topic](https://askubuntu.com/help/on-topic). Consider [Ubuntu Forums](https://ubuntuforums.org/) if you are interested in seeking opinion or making discussion. Ask Ubuntu is a Q&A site. | https://askubuntu.com/tour
user535733 avatar
cn flag
I think that the "Best" backup solution is the one you will be able to use on a *terrible*, awful day. That means you can confidently restore your data and configurations onto a fresh install, with all your passwords and addresses and bookmarks and e-mail wiped (but backed up, of course). The answer is different for everybody. Ubuntu has an excellent Backup application...give it a try and see if you like it. If not, go farther afield and try others. We cannot choose for you; we don't know you.

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